Teaching Remotely

online teaching


August 25, 2020

Why choose asynchronous?

By Aimee Kelly, Reed Garber-Pearson, and Sara Vannini, UW Integrated Social Sciences

Since February 2020, most classes around the globe have moved online. Higher education is preparing for continued online and hybrid models of instruction and learning going forward. We want to advocate for examining course design more critically. What is the difference between synchronous and asynchronous? Why should instructors choose one or the other?


Strategies for successful asynchronous courses

By Aimee Kelly, Reed Garber-Pearson, Sara Vannini, UW Integrated Social Sciences

A well-developed asynchronous learning experience usually requires significant work before the quarter begins. It is critical to align the overall course objectives, the individual lesson objectives, and associated course materials and assignments to create a coherent structure.


Take-away strategies for asynchronous online learning

By Aimee Kelly, Reed Garber-Pearson, Sara Vannini, UW Integrated Social Sciences

Strategies for asynchronous online learning from the Integrated Social Sciences Program, including: thinking about your lessons in terms of a flipped classroom environment, designing a space to foster social learning and community building, and working on your instructor presence.


July 30, 2020

Using Team Operating Rules to foster collaboration

By Jennifer Diamond and Julie Scales, Project Management Certificate (UW Professional & Continuing Education, Continuum College)

Collaborative projects are a key component of many UW courses. But before project work begins, teams need to connect, set ground rules, and articulate norms for shared work and outcomes. For the Certificate in Project Management capstone course, we developed an assignment that models this activity.


May 28, 2020

Teaching Spanish: A multi-day “finale” instead of a final exam

Samuel Jaffee, Spanish and Portuguese Studies

By Samuel Jaffee, Spanish & Portuguese StudiesĀ 

This spring quarter I’m teaching Spanish 302 and Spanish 303, both of which guide students in developing writing strategies in Spanish (creative fiction, business letters, reportage, argument and counterargument, and literary and visual analysis). In lieu of a final exam, both classes will enjoy a multi-day “finale.”


March 19, 2020

Teaching from everywhere

Rick Mohler, UW Architecture

Find out how Rick Mohler, UW associate professor of architecture, is teaching his Research Design Studio students, as they discuss how they have re-imagined six Seattle neighborhoods.